Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Filters applied. Clear all
. 2015 Oct;26(9-10):448-55.
doi: 10.1007/s00335-015-9600-0. Epub 2015 Sep 15.

The International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR): Cataloging Worldwide Mouse and ES Cell Line Resources

Affiliations
Free PMC article

The International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR): Cataloging Worldwide Mouse and ES Cell Line Resources

Janan T Eppig et al. Mamm Genome. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The availability of and access to quality genetically defined, health-status known mouse resources is critical for biomedical research. By ensuring that mice used in research experiments are biologically, genetically, and health-status equivalent, we enable knowledge transfer, hypothesis building based on multiple data streams, and experimental reproducibility based on common mouse resources (reagents). Major repositories for mouse resources have developed over time and each has significant unique resources to offer. Here we (a) describe The International Mouse Strain Resource that offers users a combined catalog of worldwide mouse resources (live, cryopreserved, embryonic stem cells), with direct access to repository sites holding resources of interest and (b) discuss the commitment to nomenclature standards among resources that remain a challenge in unifying mouse resource catalogs.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Overview of IMSR process. (1) Individual repository databases initiate data contribution to IMSR by providing a format-specified text file to IMSR via a private FTP site. Automated checks confirm that the incoming data file is properly formatted and that fields contain the data of correct type. If not, (2a) data are returned with comment to inform the repository of error corrections required for submission. If data pass this automated check, (2b) data are processed to compare them to MGD data (3) standardizing nomenclature to allow better web links and producing nomenclature and new data reports for curator action. Repository data are replaced with a new version (4a) for display on the IMSR website and (4b) curators correct and/or update repository submitted nomenclature and add new data to MGD. The curation results also are returned to the repository (5) for updating their files with the correct nomenclature for the alleles, genes, and strains that they hold in their resource
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
IMSR homepage/search page. (www.findmice.org). This web page introduces IMSR and is the search form for IMSR content. The search section has (1) a Quick Search option (green bar located mid-page), where one may type in a single field a mutant allele, gene, or strain and click the search button; (2) a strain search section where one may further specify the “state” (e.g., embryo, live) in which the resource is maintained and the “strain type” which defines how the strain is bred; (3) a Repository search limiting results to one or more specific repositories of choice, or using the map, limit one’s search to a particular continent; and (4) mutation type, specifying how the mutant allele of interest was created (e.g., gene trap, transgenic, targeted)
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Example IMSR search result. This screenshot shows the first 10 (of 29) lines returned when searching IMSR for strains with mutations in the Stat3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) gene. Columns shown include (1) “N” for nomenclature, where + is correct; − is incorrect, and ? is unreviewed; (2) Strain Name, each strain name links to the strain description page on the respective repository’s website; (3) Synonyms, other names that this strain has been called, including former names and lab-jargon names; (4) States are how the mouse resource exists—live, cryopreserved embryo, sperm, or ova, or ES cell line; (5) the Repository column provides two links, when available—an email link to user assistance at the repository site and a link to “order” the mouse resource from the repository site; (6) Mutation type, as provided by repository data; (7) Alleles, symbol and name, as provided by repository or enhanced by MGD linking; (8) Genes indicating those mutated in the mouse stock in question; and (7) Strain Type defined by breeding scheme, if known. Buttons to export the current results are found above the strain name column
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Interplay between MGD and IMSR that maximizes user access. A user searching for a particular strain or mutations in a particular gene can quickly find these resources using the IMSR interface (see Figs. 2, 3 and text). However, if a user does not know the strain or mutant desired, but wants to search for mouse resources on the basis of phenotype or disease model, he/she would start with a phenotype/disease search of MGD. Using either entry point, the user can easily follow links between them. For example, a user who searched MGD for a phenotype of absent cochlear hair cells or the human disease Pendred Syndrome would view phenotype detail pages such as the one shown for Slc26a4 pdsm (top panel). From this page, a link to IMSR (red circle) will lead the user to IMSR for a list of strains and cell lines available with Slc26a4 mutations (bottom panel). The link shown from IMSR (red circle) will lead to the relevant detailed phenotype/disease page in MGD

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 16 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Aida T, Chiyo K, Usami T, Ishikubo H, Imahashi R, Wada Y, Tanaka KF, Sakuma T, Yamamoto T, Tanaka K. Cloning-free CRISPR/Cas system facilitates functional cassette knock-in in mice. Genome Biol. 2015;16:87. doi: 10.1186/s13059-015-0653-x. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Arnold CN, Barnes MJ, Berger M, Blasius AL, Brandl K, Croker B, Crozat K, Du X, Eidenschenk C, Georgel P, Hoebe K, Huang H, Jiang Z, Krebs P, La Vine D, Li X, Lyon S, Moresco EM, Murray AR, Popkin DL, Rutschmann S, Siggs OM, Smart NG, Sun L, Tabeta K, Webster V, Tomisato W, Won S, Xia Y, Xiao N, Beutler B. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations. BMC Res Notes. 2012;5:577. doi: 10.1186/1756-0500-5-577. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Brown SD, Moore MW. The international mouse phenotyping consortium: past and future perspectives on mouse phenotyping. Mamm Genome. 2012;23:632–640. doi: 10.1007/s00335-012-9427-x. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Eppig JT, Strivens M. Finding a mouse: The International Mouse Strain Resource (IMSR) Trends Genet. 1999;15:21–81. doi: 10.1016/S0168-9525(98)01665-5. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Eppig JT, Bult CJ, Kadin JA, Richardson JE, Blake JA, Anagnostopoulos A, Baldarelli RM, Baya M, Beal JS, Bello SM, Boddy WJ, Bradt DW, Burkart DL, Butler NE, Campbell J, Cassell MA, Corbani LE, Cousins SL, Dahmen DJ, Dene H, Diehl AD, Drabkin HJ, Frazer KS, Frost P, Glass LH, Goldsmith CW, Grant PL, Lennon-Pierce M, Lewis J, Lu I, Maltais LJ, McAndrews-Hill M, McClellan L, Miers DB, Miller LA, Ni L, Ormsby JE, Qi D, Reddy TB, Reed DJ, Richards-Smith B, Shaw DR, Sinclair R, Smith CL, Szauter P, Walker MB, Walton DO, Washburn LL, Witham IT, Zhu Y, Mouse Genome Database Group The mouse genome database (MGD): from genes to mice—a community resource for mouse biology. Nucleic Acids Res. 2005;33:D471–D475. doi: 10.1093/nar/gki113. - DOI - PMC - PubMed

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback