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Review
, 12, 170

Mast Cells in Meningiomas and Brain Inflammation

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Review

Mast Cells in Meningiomas and Brain Inflammation

Stavros Polyzoidis et al. J Neuroinflammation.

Abstract

Background: Research focus in neuro-oncology has shifted in the last decades towards the exploration of tumor infiltration by a variety of immune cells and their products. T cells, macrophages, B cells, and mast cells (MCs) have been identified.

Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Turning Research into Practice (TRIP) for the presence of MCs in meningiomas using the terms meningioma, inflammation and mast cells.

Results: MCs have been detected in various tumors of the central nervous system (CNS), such as gliomas, including glioblastoma multiforme, hemangioblastomas, and meningiomas as well as metastatic brain tumors. MCs were present in as many as 90 % of all high-grade meningiomas mainly found in the perivascular areas of the tumor. A correlation between peritumoral edema and MCs was found.

Interpretation: Accumulation of MCs in meningiomas could contribute to the aggressiveness of tumors and to brain inflammation that may be involved in the pathogenesis of additional disorders.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Photomicrographs of tissue samples of dura and bone infiltrated by meningioma of the meningothelial type grade I obtained from a brain lesion following a left-left frontotemporal craniectomy. Mast cells were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of tryptase (brown color). a Dura showing the upper unaffected part and the lower part infiltrated meningioma cells (blue) and accumulated mast cells (brown); magnification = ×40. b Unaffected dura; magnification = ×100. c Bone infiltrated by meningioma cells showing a cluster of mast cells; magnification = ×100. d Mast cells surrounding clusters of meningioma cells infiltrating the dura; magnification = ×400. e One mast cell surrounded by meningioma cells; this mast cell does not appear to be degranulated. Bar = 15 μm
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Photomicrographs of tissue samples of dura infiltrated by meningioma of the meningothelial type grade I obtained from a brain lesion following a left-left frontotemporal craniectomy. Mast cells were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of CD117 (brown color). a Unaffected dura showing two mast cells. b Dura infiltrated by meningioma cells showing a number of mast cells (brown color). Magnification = ×200

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