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. 2016 Jan;19(1):20-24.
doi: 10.1111/ner.12348. Epub 2015 Sep 21.

Deep Brain Recordings Using an Implanted Pulse Generator in Parkinson's Disease

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Free PMC article

Deep Brain Recordings Using an Implanted Pulse Generator in Parkinson's Disease

Wolf-Julian Neumann et al. Neuromodulation. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objectives: Recent studies suggest that oscillatory beta activity could be used as a state biomarker in patients with Parkinson's disease for subthalamic closed-loop stimulation with the intention of improving clinical benefit. Here we investigate the feasibility of subthalamic recordings via a novel chronically implanted pulse generator.

Methods: Subthalamic local field potential recordings were obtained from eight patients before and during deep brain stimulation (DBS). All data were analyzed in the frequency domain using Fourier transform-based methods and compared between ON and OFF stimulation conditions.

Results: Distinct peaks of oscillatory beta band activity were found in 12 of 15 electrodes. DBS induced a significant frequency specific suppression of oscillatory beta activity (p = 0.002).

Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that oscillatory beta band synchronization and its modulation by DBS is recordable with a system suitable for chronic implantation and may serve as a biomarker for subthalamic closed-loop stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Keywords: Basal ganglia; beta oscillations; deep brain stimulation; local field potentials; subthalamic nucleus.

Conflict of interest statement

Disclosure: Medtronic provided all material for this study for free. No conflict of interest is to be reported.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Local field potentials ON and OFF subthalamic high frequency stimulation.
Examples of raw data traces (A) and corresponding power spectra (B) showing a broad 13 – 20 Hz peak that is suppressed by deep brain stimulation in case 5. Averaged normalized power spectra (C, colored shaded areas display the 95 % confidence intervals) show a significant reduction of 14 % in beta band activity (D, p = 0.002), but no modulation of alpha band activity (E, p = 0.3). Averaged frequency bands are highlighted as light and dark grey shaded areas for alpha and beta frequency bands in figures 1B, C, respectively. A stronger effect was found when only contact pairs with distinct beta (13-30Hz) peaks were included in the analysis (F, 18 % beta band reduction, p < 0.001). Direct comparison of peak aligned, then averaged spectra (G, 0 Hz on the x-axis is the individual peak for each contact pair, mean frequency of peak before alignment 17 Hz ± 0.8 Hz) revealed a significant band from − 1.4 to +5.8 Hz surrounding the peaks (shown as gray shaded area; FDR corrected for multiple comparisons; significant threshold p ≤ 0.03).

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