Differences in Acculturation and Trajectories of Anxiety and Alcohol Consumption Among Latina Mothers and Daughters in South Florida

J Immigr Minor Health. 2016 Aug;18(4):886-895. doi: 10.1007/s10903-015-0277-y.

Abstract

This study documents generational differences in the impact of acculturation related factors on anxiety and alcohol use behaviors between adult Latino mothers and adult daughters. Findings indicate that for mothers (n = 144) and daughters (n = 149), self-reported anxiety levels decreased from baseline to follow up (p = 0.001). For mothers at follow up (n = 147), results indicate that affiliation to Latino culture is negatively associated with anxiety (p = 0.018). Conversely, employment and partner relationship stress are positively associated with anxiety (p = 0.05 and p = 0.016 respectively). In addition, self-reported anxiety is positively associated with alcohol intake (p = 0.002) and employment (p = 0.007). For daughters(n = 149), partner relationship stressors, anxiety and alcohol intake decreased significantly from baseline to follow up at a p = 0.01, p = 0.01, p = 0.05 respectively. In addition, for daughters at baseline (n = 160), affiliation to U.S. culture is positively associated with self-reported anxiety (p = 0.01). Employment is negatively associated with alcohol consumption (p = 0.027). At follow up (n = 152), daughters' partner relationship stress is positively associated with self- reported anxiety (p = 0.049). Findings in this study can be used to develop culturally appropriate interventions, support groups and individual therapy sessions by taking into consideration generational differences among Latino women.

Keywords: Acculturation; Alcohol consuption; Anxiety; Latina mothers and daughters.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Acculturation*
  • Adult
  • Adult Children / ethnology
  • Alcohol Drinking / ethnology*
  • Anxiety / ethnology*
  • Emigrants and Immigrants / psychology
  • Employment
  • Female
  • Florida / epidemiology
  • Hispanic Americans / psychology*
  • Humans
  • Interpersonal Relations*
  • Middle Aged
  • Mother-Child Relations / psychology
  • Mothers / psychology*
  • Self Report
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Spouses / ethnology