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Randomized Controlled Trial
, 12 (1), 180-7

Preoperative Lifestyle Intervention in Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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Randomized Controlled Trial

Preoperative Lifestyle Intervention in Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Melissa A Kalarchian et al. Surg Obes Relat Dis.

Abstract

Background: Studies on the impact of presurgery weight loss and lifestyle preparation on outcomes following bariatric surgery are needed.

Objective: To evaluate whether a presurgery behavioral lifestyle intervention improves weight loss through a 24-month postsurgery period.

Setting: Bariatric Center of Excellence at a large, urban medical center.

Methods: Candidates for bariatric surgery were randomized to a 6-month behavioral lifestyle intervention or to 6 months of usual presurgical care. The lifestyle intervention consisted of 8 weekly face-to-face sessions, followed by 16 weeks of face-to-face and telephone sessions before surgery; the intervention also included 3 monthly telephone contacts after surgery. Assessments were conducted 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery.

Results: Participants who underwent surgery (n = 143) were 90.2% female and 86.7% White. Average age was 44.9 years, and average body mass index was 47.5 kg/m(2) at study enrollment. At follow-up, 131 (91.6%), 126 (88.1%), 117 (81.8%) patients participated in the 6-, 12-, and 24-month assessments, respectively. Percent weight loss from study enrollment to 6 and 12 months after surgery was comparable for both groups, but at 24 months after surgery, the lifestyle group had significantly smaller percent weight loss compared with the usual care group (26.5% versus 29.5%, respectively, P = .02).

Conclusions: Presurgery lifestyle intervention did not improve weight loss at 24 months after surgery. The findings from this study raise questions about the utility and timing of adjunctive lifestyle interventions for bariatric surgery patients.

Keywords: Bariatric surgery; Behavioral weight control.; Preoperative intervention.

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Kalarchian reports receiving funding for research in bariatric surgery from NIH/NIDDK, The Obesity Society (TOS)/Nutrisystem, and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). Dr. Courcoulas reports grants from Nutrisystem, grants from EndoGastric Solutions, and other from J&J Ethicon. Drs. Cheng, Levine and Marcus have nothing to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Participant recruitment and flow.
Figure 1
Figure 1
Participant recruitment and flow.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Percent weight loss by group. Figure 2a. Percent weight loss by group, adjustable gastric banding only. Figure 2b. Percent weight loss by group, gastric bypass only.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Percent weight loss by group. Figure 2a. Percent weight loss by group, adjustable gastric banding only. Figure 2b. Percent weight loss by group, gastric bypass only.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Percent weight loss by group. Figure 2a. Percent weight loss by group, adjustable gastric banding only. Figure 2b. Percent weight loss by group, gastric bypass only.

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