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, 48 (2), 139-43

How Were Lipofilling Cannulae Designed and Are They as Safe as We Believe?

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How Were Lipofilling Cannulae Designed and Are They as Safe as We Believe?

Memet Yazar et al. Indian J Plast Surg.

Abstract

Background: Most practitioners in plastic surgery believe that blunt tipped cannulae are safer. Interestingly, there is no study about their safety, and the problem is exactly this. As the use of blunt tipped cannulae is somehow difficult, some surgeons try other extreme alternatives, such as sharp and cutting tipped injection needles. But, they can cause complications such as vessel damage. According to these hypotheses, we tried to design a cannula which would ease the application of lipofilling and which would minimise the trauma. Contrary to the injection needle, the tips of the cannula would be blunter, and trauma would be diminished.

Objectives: After designing such a cannula, we compared it with the most frequently used Coleman type cannulae with regard to ease in utilisation, and safety. We also tried to evaluate the potential for trauma, of the regularly used cannulae.

Materials and methods: In the first part, the penetration capacity of all cannulae was measured and compared, and in the second part, the tissue damage was evaluated in an experimental model.

Results: According to the statistical and histological findings, the pointed-tip cannulae, blunted to a certain degree, can be applied easily through the tissues. The surgeon works more comfortably and we have noted that these cannulae cause less tissue damage.

Keywords: Cannula tip; fat graft; microinjection cannula.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Left: Schematic illustration of the canoe with the 30° at the front tear less bush. Right: The canoe with wider angle at the front tear more bush
Figure 2
Figure 2
The measurement of the penetration capacities of the cannulas on black polyether sponge
Figure 3
Figure 3
The markings of the left anterolateral and posterolateral of the rabbit's femur
Figure 4
Figure 4
The cannulas used for the study. Above: Coleman type 1 cannula. Middle: Coleman type 2 cannula. Below: Pointed tipped cannula designed by the author
Figure 5
Figure 5
The results of the histopathologic evaluation of the groups: (a) The myocyte degeneration, the inflammatory cells between the muscle cells, and the interstitial oedema in Group 1 (H and E ×400). (b) The interstitial oedema and haemorrhage in a small area in Group 2 (H and E×100). (c) The slightly normal morphology and interstitial oedema in the muscle cells in Group 3

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