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. 2015 Dec;42(4):319-28.
doi: 10.1111/birt.12186. Epub 2015 Oct 13.

The Association Between Common Labor Drugs and Suckling When Skin-to-Skin During the First Hour After Birth

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Free PMC article

The Association Between Common Labor Drugs and Suckling When Skin-to-Skin During the First Hour After Birth

Kajsa Brimdyr et al. Birth. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Intrapartum drugs, including fentanyl administered via epidural and synthetic oxytocin, have been previously studied in relation to neonatal outcomes, especially breastfeeding, with conflicting results. We examined the normal neonatal behavior of suckling within the first hour after a vaginal birth while in skin-to-skin contact with mother in relation to these commonly used drugs. Suckling in the first hour after birth has been shown in other studies to increase desirable breastfeeding outcomes.

Method: Prospective comparative design. Sixty-three low-risk mothers self-selected to labor with intrapartum analgesia/anesthesia or not. Video recordings of infants during the first hour after birth while being held skin-to-skin with their mother were coded and analyzed to ascertain whether or not they achieved Stage 8 (suckling) of Widström's 9 Stages of newborn behavior during the first hour after birth.

Results: A strong inverse correlation was found between the amount and duration of exposure to epidural fentanyl and the amount of synthetic oxytocin against the likelihood of achieving suckling during the first hour after a vaginal birth.

Conclusions: Results suggest that intrapartum exposure to the drugs fentanyl and synthetic oxytocin significantly decreased the likelihood of the baby suckling while skin-to-skin with its mother during the first hour after birth.

Keywords: epidural; fentanyl; skin-to-skin.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Widström's 9 instinctive stages of neonatal behavior during skin‐to‐skin contact immediately after birth (3).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Flow chart of consented mothers, collected over 4 weeks in May, July, August, and December at LLUMC, 2012, resulting in 63 mothers who were included in the study analysis.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Logistic regression of the proportion of babies of consented mothers who achieved Widström's Stage 8, suckling, by amount of fentanyl mother received during labor at LLUMC, 2012 (p = 0.01).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Kaplan–Meier curve for comparing the amount of fentanyl to the progression to suckling by the baby during the first hour, LLUMC, 2012. Note: The majority of these dyads also had exposure to synOT.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Kaplan–Meier curve for comparing the duration of the epidural to the progression to suckling by the baby during the first hour, LLUMC, 2012. Note: The majority of these dyads also had exposure to synOT.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Kaplan–Meier curve comparing the amount of synOT to the progression of suckling by the baby during the first hour, LLUMC, 2012. Note: The majority of these dyads also had exposure to fentanyl.

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References

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