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. 2016 Feb;20(2):235-42.
doi: 10.1007/s10461-015-1242-4.

Improvements in Depression and Changes in Fatigue: Results From the SLAM DUNC Depression Treatment Trial

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Free PMC article

Improvements in Depression and Changes in Fatigue: Results From the SLAM DUNC Depression Treatment Trial

Julie Barroso et al. AIDS Behav. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Fatigue and depression are common co-morbid conditions among people with HIV infection. We analyzed a population of HIV-infected adults with depression, who were enrolled in a depression treatment trial, to examine the extent to which improvements in depression over time were associated with improvements in HIV-related fatigue. Data for this analysis come from a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of improved depression treatment on antiretroviral adherence. Fatigue was measured using the HIV-Related Fatigue Scale, and depressive symptoms were measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Participants (n = 234) were on average nearly 44 years of age and predominantly male, black or African American, and unemployed. Individuals who experienced stronger depression response (i.e., greater improvement in depression score) had larger decreases in fatigue. However, even among those who demonstrated a full depression response, nearly three-quarters continued to have either moderate or severe fatigue at 6 and 12 months.

Keywords: Depression; Fatigue; Intervention; Syndemic.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflicts of interest The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Fatigue intensity over 12 months, stratified by change in depressive symptoms from baseline. No/partial/full response: <25 %/ 25–49 %/>49 % improvement in depressive symptoms relative to baseline. The group categorized as “Response” at baseline includes all those who demonstrated full response at either 6 or 12 months. The group categorized “Partial response” at baseline includes all those who demonstrated partial response at either 6 or 12 months but never demonstrated full response. The group categorized as “No response” at baseline includes all those who never demonstrated partial or full response at either 6 or 12 months. At 6 and 12 months, participants are classified by their depression response status at that time point

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