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Observational Study
, 94 (45), e2001

Kinetic Changes of Viremia and Viral Antigens of Hepatitis B Virus During and After Pregnancy

Affiliations
Observational Study

Kinetic Changes of Viremia and Viral Antigens of Hepatitis B Virus During and After Pregnancy

Jingli Liu et al. Medicine (Baltimore).

Abstract

Whether pregnancy may influence the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains unknown. The authors aimed to clarify this issue by observing the kinetics of HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and viral antigens in women during and after pregnancy. Total, 371 pregnant women with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were enrolled. Serial sera collected during and after pregnancy were quantitatively measured for HBV DNA, HBsAg, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg). Total, 34 HBeAg-positive women underwent alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation during or after pregnancy; levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg in them showed no obvious change between second trimester or delivery and 7 to 12 months postpartum (P > 0.05). The 337 others had normal alanine aminotransferase levels during pregnancy and postpartum. In 147 HBeAg-positive women with follow-up 7 to 12 months postpartum, the average levels of HBV DNA (>7.0 log10 IU/mL), HBsAg (>4.0 log10 IU/mL), and HBeAg (>3.0 log10 S/CO) were longitudinally constant during pregnancy and postpartum, respectively. In 173 women with follow-up 4.8 years postpartum, neither HBV DNA levels nor antigen titers showed significant difference between second trimester and 4.8 years postpartum, regardless of the HBeAg status. In addition, levels of HBV DNA and viral antigens in second trimester, around delivery, 6 to 8 weeks and 7 to 12 months postpartum showed no marked fluctuations, respectively. Serum levels of HBV DNA and viral antigens in HBsAg-positive women are highly constant during pregnancy and postpartum, regardless of the HBeAg status and alanine aminotransferase levels. This demonstrates that pregnancy has little influence on the HBV replication and antigen expression.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no funding and conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1
Dynamic change of hepatitis B virus DNA and viral antigens in second trimester, around delivery, 6 to 8 weeks and 7 to 12 months postpartum. Each number denotes an individual woman. A, During second trimester, delivery and 7 to 12 months postpartum, respectively (n = 7). B, During second trimester, 6 to 8 weeks and 7 to 12 months postpartum, respectively (n = 10).

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