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. 2015 Nov 25;10(11):e0142989.
doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142989. eCollection 2015.

Comparative Characterization of Vibrio Cholerae O1 From Five Sub-Saharan African Countries Using Various Phenotypic and Genotypic Techniques

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Free PMC article

Comparative Characterization of Vibrio Cholerae O1 From Five Sub-Saharan African Countries Using Various Phenotypic and Genotypic Techniques

Anthony M Smith et al. PLoS One. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

We used standardized methodologies to characterize Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates from Guinea, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Togo, Côte d'Ivoire and Mozambique. We investigated 257 human isolates collected in 2010 to 2013. DRC isolates serotyped O1 Inaba, while isolates from other countries serotyped O1 Ogawa. All isolates were biotype El Tor and positive for cholera toxin. All isolates showed multidrug resistance but lacked ciprofloxacin resistance. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of isolates varied between countries. In particular, the susceptibility profile of isolates from Mozambique (East-Africa) included resistance to ceftriaxone and was distinctly different to the susceptibility profiles of isolates from countries located in West- and Central-Africa. Molecular subtyping of isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed a complex relationship among isolates. Some PFGE patterns were unique to particular countries and clustered by country; while other PFGE patterns were shared by isolates from multiple countries, indicating that the same genetic lineage is present in multiple countries. Our data add to a better understanding of cholera epidemiology in Africa.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1. Map of Africa showing the countries described in the current study.
Fig 2
Fig 2. Snapshot of dendrogram of PFGE (NotI digestion) patterns for V. cholerae O1 isolates.
Fig 3
Fig 3. Snapshot of dendrogram of PFGE (NotI digestion) patterns for V. cholerae O1 isolates.

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