Vascular mTOR-dependent mechanisms linking the control of aging to Alzheimer's disease

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016 May;1862(5):992-1007. doi: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2015.11.010. Epub 2015 Nov 27.

Abstract

Aging is the strongest known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the discovery of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a critical pathway controlling the rate of aging in mice, molecules at the interface between the regulation of aging and the mechanisms of specific age-associated diseases can be identified. We will review emerging evidence that mTOR-dependent brain vascular dysfunction, a universal feature of aging, may be one of the mechanisms linking the regulation of the rate of aging to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

Keywords: Aging; Alzheimer's; Geroscience; MTOR; Neurovascular aging; Target of rapamycin.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Aging*
  • Alzheimer Disease / metabolism*
  • Alzheimer Disease / pathology
  • Alzheimer Disease / physiopathology*
  • Amyloid beta-Peptides / metabolism
  • Animals
  • Brain / blood supply*
  • Brain / metabolism
  • Brain / pathology
  • Brain / physiopathology*
  • Cerebrovascular Circulation
  • Humans
  • Signal Transduction
  • TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases / metabolism*

Substances

  • Amyloid beta-Peptides
  • TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases