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Comparative Study
, 204 (4), 306-13

Agreement Between Self- And Informant-Reported Ratings of Personality Traits: The Moderating Effects of Major Depressive and/or Panic Disorder

Affiliations
Comparative Study

Agreement Between Self- And Informant-Reported Ratings of Personality Traits: The Moderating Effects of Major Depressive and/or Panic Disorder

Lynne Lieberman et al. J Nerv Ment Dis.

Abstract

Several personality traits are risk factors for psychopathology. As symptoms of psychopathology may influence self-rated personality, informant reports of personality are also sometimes collected. However, little is known about self-informant agreement in individuals with anxiety and/or depression. We investigated whether self-informant agreement on positive and negative affectivity (PA and NA) and anxiety sensitivity differs for individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or panic disorder (PD; total n = 117). Informant- and self-reported PA was correlated among those with MDD, but not among those without MDD. Informant- and self-reported anxiety sensitivity was correlated among those with PD, but not among those without PD. Informant- and self-reported NA was correlated irrespective of diagnosis. Results indicate that the agreement of self- and informant-reported personality may vary as a function of depression and/or anxiety disorders.

Conflict of interest statement

Disclosures

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
The moderating effect of major depressive disorder on PA agreement.
Figure 2
Figure 2
The moderating effect of panic disorder on anxiety sensitivity agreement.
Figure 3
Figure 3
The moderating effect of panic disorder on mean-level differences between self- and informant-reports of anxiety sensitivity. *p < .05

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