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Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces After Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

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Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces After Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

Ella A Naumova et al. Sci Rep.

Abstract

It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately after and at 30 and 120 minutes after tooth brushing. The fluoride concentration was determined. The area under the curve was calculated for each location and compared statistically. In the tongue coating, fluoride concentration increased faster after NaF application than after AmF application. After 30 minutes, the fluoride concentration decreased and remained stable until 120 minutes after AmF application and returned to baseline after NaF application. The difference between the baseline and the endpoint measurements was statistically significant. The fluoride concentration in the tongue coating remained at a higher level compared with the baseline for up to 120 minutes post-brushing. This may indicate that the tongue coating is a major reservoir for fluoride bioavailability. The results also indicate an unequal fluoride distribution in the oral cavity.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Collection areas in the different oral niches: (a) tongue, (b) palate, (c) mouth floor and (d) cheeks.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Fluorescence microphotograph of the biofilm of the cheek surface collected with periopaper and stained with life – dead bacterial staining.
The smear contains epithelial cell at the bottom and life (green) and dead (red) bacteria.
Figure 3
Figure 3. Boxplot graphics of the dynamics of the fluoride concentration in different areas of the oral cavity after AmF and NaF application.
Figure 4
Figure 4. Boxplot graphics of the dynamics of the variation of fluoride concentration after application of AmF and NaF.
The AUC has been calculated from the differences between T1-T0, T2-T1 and T3-T2.
Figure 5
Figure 5. Boxplot graphics of the fluoride concentration at the different collection times after AmF application.
Figure 6
Figure 6. Boxplot graphics of the fluoride concentration at the different collection times after NaF application.

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