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, 3 (4), 138-40
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ECMO-dependent Respiratory Failure After Snorting Speed Associated With anti-GBM Antibodies

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Case Reports

ECMO-dependent Respiratory Failure After Snorting Speed Associated With anti-GBM Antibodies

Nicholas De Rosa et al. Respirol Case Rep.

Abstract

A previously well 20-year-old man with a history of nasal inhalation of "speed" was retrieved on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure. Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody was positive in the absence of renal disease. We postulate a hitherto unreported causal link between snorting "speed" and lung disease associated with anti-GBM antibody formation.

Keywords: Amphetamine; anti‐GBM antibody; respiratory failure; speed.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Computed tomography scan of the chest demonstrates widespread bilateral lung infiltrate, with centrilobular small nodules and tree‐in‐bud appearance peripherally, consistent with panbronchiolitis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Widespread bilateral interstitial lung markings on chest X‐ray.

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