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, 2015, 312530

Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats

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Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats

Ernesto António Macongonde et al. Dis Markers.

Abstract

Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effects of acute fructose administration on respiratory chain complexes I-III (a), II (b), II-III (c), and IV (d) activities in rat cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. Values are means ± standard error of mean for five to six independent experiments performed in duplicate and are expressed as nmol·min−1·mg protein−1. p < 0.05, ∗∗ p < 0.01, and ∗∗∗ p < 0.001 compared to controls (Student's t-test).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effects of acute fructose administration on succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) (a) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) (b) activities in rat cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. Values are means ± standard error of mean for five to six independent experiments performed in duplicate and are expressed as nmol·min−1·mg protein−1. p < 0.05 compared to controls (Student's t-test).

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