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. 2016;2016:3643824.
doi: 10.1155/2016/3643824. Epub 2015 Dec 7.

Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, and Antiulcer Potential of Manuka Honey Against Gastric Ulcer in Rats

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Free PMC article

Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, and Antiulcer Potential of Manuka Honey Against Gastric Ulcer in Rats

Saad B Almasaudi et al. Oxid Med Cell Longev. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Gastric ulcers are among the most common diseases affecting humans. This study aimed at investigating the gastroprotective effects of manuka honey against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. The mechanism by which honey exerts its antiulcer potential was elucidated. Four groups of rats were used: control, ethanol (ulcer), omeprazole, and manuka honey. Stomachs were examined macroscopically for hemorrhagic lesions in the glandular mucosa, histopathological changes, and glycoprotein detection. The effects of oxidative stress were investigated using the following indicators: gastric mucosal nitric oxide (NO), reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxide (MDA, measured as malondialdehyde) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase. Plasma tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and IL-6 were also measured. Manuka honey significantly decreased the ulcer index, completely protected the mucosa from lesions, and preserved gastric mucosal glycoprotein. It significantly increased gastric mucosal levels of NO, GSH, GPx, and SOD. Manuka honey also decreased gastric mucosal MDA and plasma TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations. In conclusion, manuka honey likely exerted its antiulcer, effect by keeping enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH and NO) antioxidants as well as inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in a reduced form, inhibited lipid peroxidation (MDA), and preserved mucous glycoproteins levels.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effect of manuka honey on the severity of gastric lesion (ulcer index) measured in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. Ethanol treated rats were pretreated with either omeprazole (40 mg/kg) or manuka honey (2.5 g/kg). Each value is the mean ± SD (n = 6). Significant versus control group (P ≤ 0.05). #Significant versus ethanol (P ≤ 0.05).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effect of different doses of manuka honey on the severity of gastric lesion (gross examination) examined in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. (a) Control: intact gastric mucosa tissues; (b) ethanol (ulcer): severe lesions are seen with extensive visible haemorrhagic necrosis of gastric mucosa; (c) manuka honey (0.1 g/kg): severe lesions are seen with extensive visible haemorrhagic necrosis of gastric mucosa; (d) manuka honey (1.0 g/kg): severe lesions are seen with extensive visible haemorrhagic necrosis of gastric mucosa; (e) omeprazole: mild lesions of gastric mucosa are observed compared to the lesions in ethanol (ulcer); (f) manuka honey (2.5 g/kg): nearly normal gastric mucosa tissues. These photographs are typical of such tissues.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect of manuka honey on the gastric mucosal glycoprotein formation detected by PAS staining in the ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. (a) Control; (b and c) ethanol (ulcer): marked glycoprotein depletion with a compensatory increase in nearby cells; (d) omeprazole: preserved gastric mucosal glycoproteins; (e) manuka honey: preserved gastric mucosal glycoproteins (sections are PAS stained ×20).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Effect of manuka honey on the gastric mucosal histopathological changes detected by H&E staining in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. (a) Control: intact mucosal layers; (b and c) ethanol (ulcer): ulcer with marked maceration of gastric mucosa; necrosis and hemorrhage (arrows). In some animals there is coagulative necrosis of superficial layers (white arrows) and evidence of submucosal widening indicating edema (stars); (d) omeprazole: normal gastric glands with focal loss of superficial mucous cells and hemorrhagic spots; (e) manuka honey: apparently normal mucosa (sections are H&E stained ×20).
Figure 5
Figure 5
Effect of manuka honey on gastric mucosal NO content (μmol/g tissue) measured in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. Ethanol treated rats were pretreated with either omeprazole (40 mg/kg) or manuka honey (2.5 g/kg). Each value is the mean ± SD (n = 6). Significant versus control group (P ≤ 0.05). #Significant versus ethanol (P ≤ 0.05).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Effect of manuka honey on gastric mucosal GSH content (U/g tissue) measured in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. Ethanol-treated rats were pretreated with either omeprazole (40 mg/kg) or manuka honey (2.5 g/kg). Each value is the mean ± SD (n = 6). Significant versus control group (P ≤ 0.05). #Significant versus ethanol (P ≤ 0.05).
Figure 7
Figure 7
Effect of manuka honey on gastric mucosal lipid peroxide (MDA) content (nmol/g tissue) measured in ethanol-induced gastric ulceration model. Ethanol treated rats were pretreated with either omeprazole (40 mg/kg) or manuka honey (2.5 g/kg). Each value is the mean ± SD (n = 6). Significant versus control group (P ≤ 0.05). #Significant versus ethanol (P ≤ 0.05).

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