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, 115 (5), 571-7

Factors Influencing the Progression of Noncarious Cervical Lesions: A 5-year Prospective Clinical Evaluation

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Factors Influencing the Progression of Noncarious Cervical Lesions: A 5-year Prospective Clinical Evaluation

Kanchan Sawlani et al. J Prosthet Dent.

Abstract

Statement of problem: The etiology (chemical, friction, abfraction) of noncarious cervical lesion (NCCL) progression is poorly understood.

Purpose: The purpose of this 5-year prospective clinical trial was to measure the relationship between NCCLs and various etiologic factors.

Material and methods: After review board approval, 29 participants with NCCLs were enrolled. Polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made of each NCCL, and casts were poured at baseline, 1, 2, and 5 years. The casts were scanned with a noncontact profilometer, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year scans were superimposed over baseline scans to measure volumetric change in NCCLs. T-scan and Fujifilm Prescale films were used to record relative and absolute occlusal forces on teeth with NCCLs at the 5-year recall. Participant diet, medical condition, toothbrushing, and adverse oral habit questionnaires were given at the 5-year recall. Occlusal analysis was completed on mounted casts to determine the presence of wear facets and group function. Volumetric lesion progression from 1 to 5 years was correlated to absolute and relative occlusal force using mixed model analysis. The Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney analyses compared lesion progression with diet, medical condition, toothbrushing, adverse oral habits, wear facets, and group function.

Results: The NCCL progression rate over 5 years was 1.50 ±0.92 mm(3)/yr. The rate of progression of NCCLs was related to mean occlusal stress (P=.011) and relative occlusal force (P=.032) in maximum intercuspation position. No difference was seen in NCCL progression between participants with any other factors.

Conclusion: Heavy occlusal forces play a significant role in the progression of NCCLs.

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