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, 94 (4), 717-20

Extremely High Prevalence of Metronidazole-Resistant Helicobacter Pylori Strains in Mountain People (Karen and Hmong) in Thailand

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Extremely High Prevalence of Metronidazole-Resistant Helicobacter Pylori Strains in Mountain People (Karen and Hmong) in Thailand

Ratha-korn Vilaichone et al. Am J Trop Med Hyg.

Abstract

This study aimed to survey the prevalence, patterns of antibiotic resistance, and clinical factors associated with antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori among the Karen and Hmong mountain people of Thailand. We recruited dyspeptic patients in the Maesod district, Tak Province, Thailand. All subjects underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and three antral gastric biopsies were obtained for rapid urease tests and culture. An epsilometer was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of amoxicillin (AMX), clarithromycin (CLR), metronidazole (MNZ), levofloxacin (LVX), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and tetracycline (TET). A total of 291 subjects were enrolled; 149 (51.2%) were infected with H. pylori. Helicobacter pylori infection was present in 47.1% of Thai, 51.7% of Karen, and 58.7% of Hmong subjects. Antibiotic resistance was present in 75.8% including AMX (0.8%), TET (0%), CLR (5.6%), MNZ (71.8%), CIP (19.4%), LVX (19.4%), and multidrug resistance in 21.8%. Karen subjects had the highest prevalence of MNZ resistance (84.6%), and Hmong subjects had the highest prevalence of fluoroquinolone (27.3%) and multidrug (34.1%) resistance. MNZ plus fluoroquinolone (14.5%) was the most common multidrug resistance. There was no association between clinical factors and antibiotic resistance. MNZ resistance was prevalent, whereas fluoroquinolone- and multidrug-resistant H. pylori infections are important problems in mountain people of Thailand.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Hmong and Karen patients registering before undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopies.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies in Hmong and Karen dyspeptic patients.

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