Translation, Validation, and Reliability of the Dutch Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument Computer Adaptive Test

Phys Ther. 2016 Sep;96(9):1430-7. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20150265. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Abstract

Background: Adequate and user-friendly instruments for assessing physical function and disability in older adults are vital for estimating and predicting health care needs in clinical practice. The Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument Computer Adaptive Test (LLFDI-CAT) is a promising instrument for assessing physical function and disability in gerontology research and clinical practice.

Objective: The aims of this study were: (1) to translate the LLFDI-CAT to the Dutch language and (2) to investigate its validity and reliability in a sample of older adults who spoke Dutch and dwelled in the community.

Design: For the assessment of validity of the LLFDI-CAT, a cross-sectional design was used. To assess reliability, measurement of the LLFDI-CAT was repeated in the same sample.

Methods: The item bank of the LLFDI-CAT was translated with a forward-backward procedure. A sample of 54 older adults completed the LLFDI-CAT, World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0, RAND 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey physical functioning scale (10 items), and 10-Meter Walk Test. The LLFDI-CAT was repeated in 2 to 8 days (mean=4.5 days). Pearson's r and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (2,1) were calculated to assess validity, group-level reliability, and participant-level reliability.

Results: A correlation of .74 for the LLFDI-CAT function scale and the RAND 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey physical functioning scale (10 items) was found. The correlations of the LLFDI-CAT disability scale with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 and the 10-Meter Walk Test were -.57 and -.53, respectively. The ICC (2,1) of the LLFDI-CAT function scale was .84, with a group-level reliability score of .85. The ICC (2,1) of the LLFDI-CAT disability scale was .76, with a group-level reliability score of .81.

Limitations: The high percentage of women in the study and the exclusion of older adults with recent joint replacement or hospitalization limit the generalizability of the results.

Conclusions: The Dutch LLFDI-CAT showed strong validity and high reliability when used to assess physical function and disability in older adults dwelling in the community.

Publication types

  • Validation Study

MeSH terms

  • Activities of Daily Living
  • Aged
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Disability Evaluation*
  • Female
  • Geriatric Assessment*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Netherlands
  • Psychometrics
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Translations