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. 2015 Nov 16;44(3):260-5.
doi: 10.1016/S2255-4971(15)30077-X. eCollection 2009 Jan.

RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

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Free PMC article

RAPID MANUFACTURING SYSTEM OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

Carlos Relvas et al. Rev Bras Ortop. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

This study, aimed the development of a methodology for rapid manufacture of orthopedic implants simultaneously with the surgical intervention, considering two potential applications in the fields of orthopedics: the manufacture of anatomically adapted implants and implants for bone loss replacement. This work innovation consists on the capitation of the in situ geometry of the implant by direct capture of the shape using an elastomeric material (polyvinylsiloxane) which allows fine detail and great accuracy of the geometry. After scanning the elastomeric specimen, the implant is obtained by machining using a CNC milling machine programmed with a dedicated CAD/CAM system. After sterilization, the implant is able to be placed on the patient. The concept was developed using low cost technology and commercially available. The system has been tested in an in vivo hip arthroplasty performed on a sheep. The time increase of surgery was 80 minutes being 40 minutes the time of implant manufacturing. The system developed has been tested and the goals defined of the study achieved enabling the rapid manufacture of an implant in a time period compatible with the surgery time.

Keywords: Arthroplasty; Bone loss; Prostheses and implants.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Procedure for the rapid manufacture of implants during surgery.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Top: the master model manufactured to receive the polyvinylsiloxane. Bottom: the pre-prosthesis prepared to be machined with the geometry of the femoral canal.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Final configuration of the implant after machining.
Figure 4
Figure 4
General view of the computing platform designed to allow for the greater ease of use of various technologies.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Surgical implant placement.

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