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, 46 (2), e19

Cohort Profile: The Saguenay Youth Study (SYS)

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Cohort Profile: The Saguenay Youth Study (SYS)

Zdenka Pausova et al. Int J Epidemiol.

Abstract

The Saguenay Youth Study (SYS) is a two-generational study of adolescents and their parents (n = 1029 adolescents and 962 parents) aimed at investigating the aetiology, early stages and trans-generational trajectories of common cardiometabolic and brain diseases. The ultimate goal of this study is to identify effective means for increasing healthy life expectancy. The cohort was recruited from the genetic founder population of the Saguenay Lac St Jean region of Quebec, Canada. The participants underwent extensive (15-h) phenotyping, including an hour-long recording of beat-by-beat blood pressure, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and abdomen, and serum lipidomic profiling with LC-ESI-MS. All participants have been genome-wide genotyped (with ∼ 8 M imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms) and a subset of them (144 adolescents and their 288 parents) has been genome-wide epityped (whole blood DNA, Infinium HumanMethylation450K BeadChip). These assessments are complemented by a detailed evaluation of each participant in a number of domains, including cognition, mental health and substance use, diet, physical activity and sleep, and family environment. The data collection took place during 2003-12 in adolescents (full) and their parents (partial), and during 2012-15 in parents (full). All data are available upon request.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (A) and abdomen (B). (A) T1-weighted images are used for deriving a number of anatomical features (e.g. global and regional volumes of grey and white matter, cortical thickness and surface area); and images of the magnetization-transfer ratio (MTR) provide insights into micro-structural properties of white matter, such as the relative content of myelin and axons (B); a set of heavily T1-weighted images are acquired during a single breath-hold and these are used to measure volumes of the kidneys (middle) and to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat, respectively. A transverse slice (position at the level of the umbilicus) shows the native and segmented images (bottom); on the segmented image, subcutaneous and visceral fat are shown, respectively, in grey and white.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Blood pressure and underlying haemodynamic parameters. Unadjusted 1-min means and standard errors of the mean of systolic blood pressure (A). Diastolic blood pressure (B), heart rate (C), stroke volume (D), cardiac output (E) and total peripheral resistance (F) are shown for girls and boys during a 52-min cardiovascular protocol that includes postural and mental challenges. Reprinted with permission from Syme et al.Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2009;163:818-25.
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
Visualization of the cognition (A) and DPS-based symptom (B) matrices as networks. (A) The cognition variables (n = 63; age-adjusted) are represented as nodes and connected by an edge if the correlation exceeds r = 0.3. In the electronic version, green (red) edges indicate positive (negative) correlations. Line thickness corresponds to strength of correlation, i.e. thicker lines represent stronger correlations. In the electronic version, colour of nodes represents the cognitive instrument used to derive a particular measure. (B) Visualization of the DPS-based symptom matrices as networks. The symptom variables (n = 98; age-adjusted) are represented as nodes and connected by an edge if the correlation exceeds r = 0.1. In the electronic version, green (red) edges indicate a positive (negative) correlation. Line thickness corresponds to strength of correlation, i.e. thicker lines represent stronger correlations. In the electronic version, colour of nodes represents the different DPS-based diagnostic categories [DPS, Diagnostic Schedule for Children (DISC) Predictive Scales].

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