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. 2016;2016:3704964.
doi: 10.1155/2016/3704964. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Manipulation of Dysfunctional Spinal Joints Affects Sensorimotor Integration in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Brain Source Localization Study

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Free PMC article

Manipulation of Dysfunctional Spinal Joints Affects Sensorimotor Integration in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Brain Source Localization Study

Dina Lelic et al. Neural Plast. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objectives. Studies have shown decreases in N30 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) peak amplitudes following spinal manipulation (SM) of dysfunctional segments in subclinical pain (SCP) populations. This study sought to verify these findings and to investigate underlying brain sources that may be responsible for such changes. Methods. Nineteen SCP volunteers attended two experimental sessions, SM and control in random order. SEPs from 62-channel EEG cap were recorded following median nerve stimulation (1000 stimuli at 2.3 Hz) before and after either intervention. Peak-to-peak amplitude and latency analysis was completed for different SEPs peak. Dipolar models of underlying brain sources were built by using the brain electrical source analysis. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to assessed differences in N30 amplitudes, dipole locations, and dipole strengths. Results. SM decreased the N30 amplitude by 16.9 ± 31.3% (P = 0.02), while no differences were seen following the control intervention (P = 0.4). Brain source modeling revealed a 4-source model but only the prefrontal source showed reduced activity by 20.2 ± 12.2% (P = 0.03) following SM. Conclusion. A single session of spinal manipulation of dysfunctional segments in subclinical pain patients alters somatosensory processing at the cortical level, particularly within the prefrontal cortex.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(a) Waveforms and topographies of baseline against the recording after control treatment. Blue waveform is baseline. Topographies are N30 topographies. This is a plot of one representative subject. (b) Waveforms and topographies of baseline against the recording after chiropractic treatment. Blue waveform is baseline. Topographies are N30 topographies. This is a plot of one representative subject. (c) Error bars for N30 amplitude. represents significant difference.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Source localization and activity. (b) are the dominant sources and (a) are their waveforms of activity. The plot is of one representative subject.
Figure 3
Figure 3
AUC error bars for each of the sources. represents significant difference.

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