Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2016 Aug;38(6):709-20.
doi: 10.1080/13803395.2016.1156652. Epub 2016 Apr 10.

The Effects of Heroin Administration and Drug Cues on Impulsivity

Affiliations
Free PMC article

The Effects of Heroin Administration and Drug Cues on Impulsivity

Jermaine D Jones et al. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug seeking and continued use despite negative consequences. Behavioral impulsivity is a strong predictor of the initiation and maintenance of drug addiction. Preclinical data suggest that heroin may exacerbate impulsive characteristics in an individual but this has yet to be assessed in clinical samples. The current secondary data analysis sought to investigate the effects of heroin on impulsivity along with the effects of exposure to drug cues. Using the current data set, we also tentatively assessed the etiological relationship between impulsivity and heroin abuse. Sixteen heroin-dependent participants were recruited to complete Immediate Memory Task/Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT) and GoStop tasks following repeated heroin administration, following acute heroin administration, and following a drug cue exposure session. Four preceding days of active heroin availability, compared to four preceding days of placebo drug availability, increased impulsivity assessed using the IMT and DMT. Presentation of drug cues similarly acted to increase impulsivity assessments on all three tasks. It also appears that heavier users were more susceptible to the influence of drug cues on impulsivity. The present study represents a step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between opioid abuse and impulsivity. A better understanding of these factors could provide critical insight into the maintenance of heroin use and relapse.

Keywords: Delayed Memory Task; GoStop; Heroin; Immediate Memory Task; Impulsivity; Opioid abuse.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflicts of Interest: Over the past three years, SDC has received compensation (in the form of partial salary support) from investigator-initiated studies supported by Reckitt-Benckiser Pharmaceuticals, Schering-Plough Corporation, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, Endo Pharmaceuticals, and MediciNova and served as a consultant to the following companies: AstraZeneca, Camurus, Collegium, Cytogel, Guidepoint Global, Janssen, Mallinckrodt, Neuromed, Orexo, Pfizer, Salix, and Shire. The other authors have no conflicts to report.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Immediate Memory Task
Figure 2
Figure 2
Delayed Memory Task
Figure 3
Figure 3
Gostop Task
Figure 4
Figure 4
Drug Self-Administration
Figure 5
Figure 5
Heroin use and Impulsivity

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 4 articles

Feedback