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Case Reports
. 2016 Dec;29(6):665-669.
doi: 10.1007/s10278-016-9879-8.

Integration of Computed Tomography and Three-Dimensional Echocardiography for Hybrid Three-Dimensional Printing in Congenital Heart Disease

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Free PMC article
Case Reports

Integration of Computed Tomography and Three-Dimensional Echocardiography for Hybrid Three-Dimensional Printing in Congenital Heart Disease

Jordan Gosnell et al. J Digit Imaging. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology aiding diagnostics, education, and interventional, and surgical planning in congenital heart disease (CHD). Three-dimensional printing has been derived from computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and 3D echocardiography. However, individually the imaging modalities may not provide adequate visualization of complex CHD. The integration of the strengths of two or more imaging modalities has the potential to enhance visualization of cardiac pathomorphology. We describe the feasibility of hybrid 3D printing from two imaging modalities in a patient with congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (L-TGA). Hybrid 3D printing may be useful as an additional tool for cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons in planning interventions in children and adults with CHD.

Keywords: 3D echocardiography; 3D imaging; 3D reconstruction; 3D segmentation; Cardiac imaging; Clinical application; Computed tomography; Integration; Registration.

Conflict of interest statement

Compliance with Ethical Standards Disclosures The authors Gosnell, Samuel, Kurup, and Haw have nothing to disclose. Pietila is a full-time employee of Materialise NV. Vettukattil has a non-disclosure agreement with Materialise NV.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
The HeartPrint® Flex 3D printed model: the translucent material depicts the extracardiac structures and the cardiac contour from CT with the right (green) and left (pink) atrioventricular valve morphology derived from 3D TEE
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
The right (green) and left (pink) atrioventricular valve morphology derived from 3D TEE. The leaflets of the systemic atrioventricular valve (pink) are clearly defined; however, the mitral valve (green) was less accurate due to the data acquisition being impacted by interference by the pacing wires
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
The Amplatzer device in the atrial septum is visualized on the 3D-printed model

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