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. 2016 Apr;32(2):103-8.
doi: 10.5487/TR.2016.32.2.103. Epub 2016 Apr 30.

Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice

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Free PMC article

Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice

Boo Hyeong Lee et al. Toxicol Res. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent.

Keywords: C57BL/6 mice; Dermal thickness; Hair follicle; Hair growth; Lavender oil.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Hair growth effects in an alopecia model of C57BL/6 mice to which test compounds were applied topically for 4 weeks. N: saline, VC: jojoba oil, PC: 3% minoxidil, E1: 3% lavender oil, E2: 5% lavender oil. (A) Photographs of the back skin. From week 3, PC, E1, and E2 groups showed notable darkening of skin color, and over time they showed a markedly greater hair growth than the N group. (B) Hair growth area of back skin. Each value represents the mean ± SD of 6 mice. a,b,cValues with different superscripts indicate significant differences (p < 0.05) for each given week, by ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range tests.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Histological observation of hair follicles and dermal thickness in the back skin of C57BL/6 mice to which test compounds were applied topically for 4 weeks. N: saline, VC: jojoba oil, PC: 3% minoxidil, E1: 3% lavender oil, E2: 5% lavender oil. (A) Hair follicles. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, × 100. (B) Hair follicle number. (C) Hair follicle depth. (D) Dermal thickness. As the experiment progressed, the hair follicle number and depth in the PC, E1, and E2 groups increased markedly as compared to the N and VC groups. The dermal layer was also observed to be thicker in the PC, E1, and E2 groups. a,b,c,d,eValues with different superscripts indicate significant differences (p < 0.05) for each given week, by ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range tests.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Histological observation of mast cells in the back skin of C57BL/6 mice to which test compounds were applied topically for 4 weeks. N: saline, VC: jojoba oil, PC: 3% minoxidil, E1: 3% lavender oil, E2: 5% lavender oil. (A) Mast cells. Toluidine blue staining, × 200. In the PC, E1, and E2 groups, the number of mast cells (arrows marks) gradually decreased as compared to the N group. (B) Mast cell number. Each value represents the mean ± SD of 6 mice. a,b,c,dValues with different superscripts at a given week are significantly (p < 0.05) different by ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range tests.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Comparison in the organ weights of the thymus and spleen of C57BL/6 mice to which test compounds were applied topically for 4 weeks. N: saline, VC: jojoba oil, PC: 3% minoxidil, E1: 3% lavender oil, E2: 5% lavender oil. (A) Absolute weight. (B) Relative weight. Each value represents the mean ± SD of 6 mice. a,bValues with different superscripts indicate significant differences (p < 0.05), by ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range tests.

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