Prevention and Management of Treatment Failure to New Oral Hepatitis C Drugs

Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2016 Jun;17(9):1215-23. doi: 10.1080/14656566.2016.1182156. Epub 2016 May 9.

Abstract

Introduction: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has become a curable disease. Sustained virologic response rates above 90% have been achieved with recommended direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combinations in most registration trials. However, outcomes in real-world patients are lower. In patients experiencing DAA failure, resistance-associated variants (RAVs) are almost universally selected. At this time it is unclear when and how to re-treat hepatitis C in patients with prior DAA failure.

Areas covered: The rate of DAA failure and predictors of lack of treatment response using distinct DAA combinations are analyzed. We discuss the management of HCV treatment failure and the impact of RAVs on re-treatment strategies.

Expert opinion: Failure to DAA combinations occurs more often in chronic hepatitis C patients with baseline predictors of poor response, such as those with RAVs, genotypes 3 or 1a, advanced liver cirrhosis, elevated serum HCV-RNA and perhaps HIV coinfection. Impaired antiviral efficacy is more frequent when multiple factors are present. On-treatment predictors of DAA failure are poor drug adherence and development of side effects. Extending the length of therapy, adding ribavirin and/or using DAA from other drug families may allow successful re-treatment of most prior DAA failures.

Keywords: Hepatitis C; daclatasvir; drug resistance; paritaprevir; simeprevir; sofosbuvir; treatment failure.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Administration, Oral
  • Antiviral Agents / administration & dosage*
  • Coinfection
  • Drug Resistance, Viral / drug effects
  • Drug Therapy, Combination / methods
  • Hepacivirus / drug effects
  • Hepatitis C / drug therapy*
  • Hepatitis C, Chronic / diagnosis
  • Hepatitis C, Chronic / drug therapy*
  • Humans
  • Liver Cirrhosis / drug therapy
  • Prognosis
  • Treatment Failure

Substances

  • Antiviral Agents