Associations Between Socioeconomic Factors and Alcohol Outcomes

Alcohol Res. 2016;38(1):83-94.

Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) is one of the many factors influencing a person's alcohol use and related outcomes. Findings have indicated that people with higher SES may consume similar or greater amounts of alcohol compared with people with lower SES, although the latter group seems to bear a disproportionate burden of negative alcohol-related consequences. These associations are further complicated by a variety of moderating factors, such as race, ethnicity, and gender. Thus, among individuals with lower SES, members of further marginalized communities, such as racial and ethnic minorities and homeless individuals, experience greater alcohol-related consequences. Future studies are needed to more fully explore the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between SES and alcohol outcomes. This knowledge should be applied toward the development of multilevel interventions that address not only individual-level risks but also economic disparities that have precipitated and maintained a disproportionate level of alcohol-related consequences among more marginalized and vulnerable populations.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology*
  • Alcoholism / epidemiology*
  • Educational Status
  • Employment / statistics & numerical data
  • Ethnic Groups / statistics & numerical data*
  • Homeless Persons / statistics & numerical data*
  • Housing / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Income / statistics & numerical data*
  • Minority Groups / statistics & numerical data*
  • Poverty / statistics & numerical data
  • Risk Factors
  • Social Class*
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Unemployment / statistics & numerical data*
  • United States