Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Case Reports
. 2016 Jul;35(7):1015-8.
doi: 10.1097/ICO.0000000000000881.

Corneoscleral Laceration and Ocular Burns Caused by Electronic Cigarette Explosions

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Case Reports

Corneoscleral Laceration and Ocular Burns Caused by Electronic Cigarette Explosions

Grace L Paley et al. Cornea. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Purpose: To report cases of acute globe rupture and bilateral corneal burns from electronic cigarette (EC) explosions.

Methods: Case series.

Results: We describe a series of patients with corneal injury caused by EC explosions. Both patients suffered bilateral corneal burns and decreased visual acuity, and one patient sustained a unilateral corneoscleral laceration with prolapsed iris tissue and hyphema. A review of the scientific literature revealed no prior reported cases of ocular injury secondary to EC explosions; however, multiple media and government agency articles describe fires and explosions involving ECs, including at least 4 with ocular injuries.

Conclusions: Given these cases and the number of recent media reports, ECs pose a significant public health risk. Users should be warned regarding the possibility of severe injury, including sight-threatening ocular injuries ranging from corneal burns to full-thickness corneoscleral laceration.

Conflict of interest statement

Mid-America Transplant provided funding for Open Access for this article. The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

FIGURE 1.
FIGURE 1.
Case 1, corneoscleral laceration of the right eye 1 day after repair (Seidel-negative), epithelial defect with fluorescein staining, persistent hyphema, and subconjunctival hemorrhage.
FIGURE 2.
FIGURE 2.
Case 1, extensive epithelial defect in left eye with fluorescein stain and diffuse conjunctival injection at 1 day after injury.
FIGURE 3.
FIGURE 3.
Case 2, right eye at presentation with superotemporal corneal burn sparing visual axis. Note the thick, matted black material along the lash line and partially coating the ocular surface.
FIGURE 4.
FIGURE 4.
Case 2, right eye after bedside debridement. Note the areas of burned corneal and conjunctival epithelium with embedded black material that did not clear with gentle debridement, and the temporal limbal blanching.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 3 articles

References

    1. Schoenborn CA, Gindi RM. Electronic Cigarette Use Among Adults: United States, 2014. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics; 2015. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db217.pdf. Accessed November 2, 2015.
    1. Public Health Focus: Electronic Cigarettes. United States Food and Drug Administration; 2015. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm172906.htm. Accessed November 1, 2015.
    1. Brown CJ, Cheng JM. Electronic cigarettes: product characterisation and design considerations. Tob Control. 2014;23(suppl 2):ii4–ii10. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Morean ME, Kong G, Camenga DR, et al. High School Students' use of electronic cigarettes to vaporize cannabis. Pediatrics. 2015;136:611–616. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Yang L, Rudy SF, Cheng JM, et al. Electronic cigarettes: incorporating human factors engineering into risk assessments. Tob Control. 2014;23(suppl 2):ii47–ii53. - PMC - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback