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, 18 (3), e21019
eCollection

Ananas Comosus Effect on Perineal Pain and Wound Healing After Episiotomy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

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Ananas Comosus Effect on Perineal Pain and Wound Healing After Episiotomy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Samira Golezar. Iran Red Crescent Med J.

Abstract

Background: Ananas comosus has long been used for medical purposes. Currently, we are experiencing an unprecedented interest in the use of complementary medicine as well as a growing attention to traditional products such as bromelain for wound healing and reducing pain.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral bromelain on perineal pain and wound healing after episiotomy in primiparous women.

Patients and methods: In this double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 82 primiparous women fulfilling the inclusion criteria received bromelain or placebo randomly. Participants were given three tablets, three times a day for six successive days. The initial dose was given 2 hours after delivery. Episiotomy pain was measured using VAS scale before the initial dose, as well as on the 1st hour and on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after the initial dose. Wound healing was measured using REEDA scale on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after delivery.

Results: Episiotomy pain significantly reduced in bromelain group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05) and wound healing was faster in bromelain group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05) on follow-up days.

Conclusions: The results showed the effectiveness of bromelain on episiotomy pain and wound healing. Therefore, it is suggested to use bromelain in postoperative stage to improve wound healing and reduce pain.

Keywords: Bromelains; Episiotomy; Pain; Wound Healing.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.. Flowchart of Participants in the Study on the Effect of Oral Bromelain on Perineal Pain and Wound Healing in Primiparous Women
Figure 2.
Figure 2.. Comparison of Pain Reduction Process Between Bromelain and Placebo Groups
Figure 3.
Figure 3.. Mean Wound Healing Score for the Two Study Groups in 14-Day Period

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