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Rethinking Intelligence Quotient Exclusion Criteria Practices in the Study of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

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Rethinking Intelligence Quotient Exclusion Criteria Practices in the Study of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Genevieve B Mackenzie et al. Front Psychol.

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with lower than average intelligence quotient (IQ) scores. However, research done on this disorder often excludes participants based on lower than average IQ's (i.e., between 70 and 85). The purpose of this paper is to alert researchers to the consequences of excluding participants based on IQ's within this range and to highlight the importance of providing a clear rationale when choosing to exclude participants based on IQ. Next, we offer recommendations for researching ADHD and their relative benefits and drawbacks of these approaches. Overall this paper emphasizes that including participants who have lower than average IQ in research on ADHD may promote a more realistic understanding of the condition and in turn improve our ability to treat it.

Keywords: attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; exclusion criteria; inclusion criteria; intelligence quotient; mild intellectual impairment.

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Cited by 3 PubMed Central articles

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