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. 2017 Jan;22(1):127-133.
doi: 10.1177/2156587216655263. Epub 2016 Jun 26.

Antidiabetic Mechanisms of Rosa Canina Fruits: An In Vitro Evaluation

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Free PMC article

Antidiabetic Mechanisms of Rosa Canina Fruits: An In Vitro Evaluation

Ali Fattahi et al. J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Rosa canina fruits have been used traditionally for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications. The aim of current study was to evaluate the in vitro mechanism of action of R canina in managing diabetes mellitus. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assay were performed on pancreatic β-cells, βTC6. The protective activity of the extract on streptozotocin-induced death in βTC6 cells was studied. The effect of R canina on the metabolism of glucose in HepG2, a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, was evaluated. The effect of the extract on glucose diffusion across the dialysis membrane, which is a comfortable model for assessing cellular glucose absorption, was evaluated. The results obtained from current study confirmed that R canina extract can act as a growth factor for pancreatic β-cell line providing a novel mechanism for the observed antidiabetic effect of this natural agent. Further preclinical studies are necessary to evaluate the perfect mechanism of action of R canina in diabetes mellitus.

Keywords: Rosa canina; cell proliferation; diabetes mellitus; traditional medicine.

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Conflicting Interests: The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Cytotoxic activity of Rosa extract on βTC6 cells. βTC6 cells were cultured on a 96-well plate, at a concentration of 5 × 104 cells/mL in the absence or presence of different concentrations of Rosa extract (0.00001 to 1 mg/mL). Cell viability was measured using a cell proliferation kit (MTT), 24 hours after seeding. *Values are significantly different compared with control cells (P < .05).
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Rosa extract enhances proliferation of βTC6 cells. βTC6 cells were cultured on a 96-well plate, at a concentration of 2 × 104 cells/mL in the absence or presence of Rosa extract (0.001 mg/mL). Single dose proliferation was measured using a cell proliferation (MTT) assay 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after seeding. Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation of 2 determinations. *Values are significantly different compared with control cells (P < .05). Abs = absorbance.
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
Morphological and number changes in the βTC6 cells. βTC6 cells that were exposed to Rosa extract after 24 (A), 48 (B), 72 (C), and 96 (D) hours. Untreated control βTC6 cells after 24 (E), 48 (F), 72 (G), and 96 (H) hours. Cell number and morphological changes were examined using invert microscopy.
Figure 4.
Figure 4.
Effect of Rosa extract (Re) on STZ-induced cell death. About 50% inhibition of cell proliferation was induced by 5 mM STZ for 24 hours. Concentrations of 0.1 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL of Rosa extract were added together with 5 mM STZ and the percentage cell survival was determined by MTT assay. *Values are significantly different compared with STZ-control cells (P < .05).
Figure 5.
Figure 5.
Effect of Rosa extract on the diffusion of glucose out of dialysis tube after 3 hours. Means are not significantly different compared with control as determined, P > .05.
Figure 6.
Figure 6.
Glucose consumption was measured after 24-hour incubation of HepG2 cell line with 1 mg/mL concentration of Rosa extract under 11.1 mml/L glucose concentration. Means are not significantly different compared with control as determined, P > .05.

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