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Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

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Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

Janelle L Davis et al. Nutr Metab Insights.

Abstract

Intravenous administration of vitamin C has been shown to decrease oxidative stress and, in some instances, improve physiological function in adult humans. Oral vitamin C administration is typically less effective than intravenous, due in part to inferior vitamin C bioavailability. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of oral delivery of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes. On 4 separate randomly ordered occasions, 11 men and women were administered an oral placebo, or 4 g of vitamin C via oral, oral liposomal, or intravenous delivery. The data indicate that oral delivery of 4 g of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes (1) produces circulating concentrations of vitamin C that are greater than unencapsulated oral but less than intravenous administration and (2) provides protection from ischemia-reperfusion-mediated oxidative stress that is similar to the protection provided by unencapsulated oral and intravenous administrations.

Keywords: intravenous; liposome; oral; oxidative stress; thiobarbituric acid reactive substances.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Schematic representation of protocol. On four separate occasions, following baseline blood collection, participants were administered either an oral placebo or 4 g of vitamin C via oral, oral liposomal, or intravenous delivery. Three hours after initiation of treatment, a blood pressure cuff was placed around the upper arm and inflated to 200 mmHg for 20 minutes.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Plasma concentrations of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) before (time = 0 minute) and after: (1) oral administration of placebo, (2) oral administration of 4 g of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes, (3) oral administration of 4 g of unencapsulated vitamin C, and (4) intravenous administration of 4 g of vitamin C. (A) All treatments. (B) All treatments excluding intravenous administration. Twenty minutes of forearm ischemia was initiated at three hours. *P < 0.001 vs all other treatments; #P < 0.001 vs unencapsulated oral and placebo; and ^P < 0.001 vs placebo. Data are mean ± SE (plasma vitamin C: 1 mg/dL = 56.78 μmol/L).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Change in circulating concentrations of TBARS from baseline (before) and after: (1) oral administration of placebo, (2) oral administration of 4 g of vitamin C encapsulated in liposomes, (3) oral administration of 4 g of unencapsulated vitamin C, and (4) intravenous administration of 4 g of vitamin C. Twenty minutes of forearm ischemia was initiated at three hours. *P < 0.046 vs all other treatments. Data are mean ± SE.

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