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Free Associations Mirroring Self- And World-Related Concepts: Implications for Personal Construct Theory, Psycholinguistics and Philosophical Psychology

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Free Associations Mirroring Self- And World-Related Concepts: Implications for Personal Construct Theory, Psycholinguistics and Philosophical Psychology

Martin Kuška et al. Front Psychol.

Abstract

People construe reality by using words as basic units of meaningful categorization. The present theory-driven study applied the method of a free association task to explore how people express the concepts of the world and the self in words. The respondents were asked to recall any five words relating with the word world. Afterward they were asked to recall any five words relating with the word self. The method of free association provided the respondents with absolute freedom to choose any words they wanted. Such free recall task is suggested as being a relatively direct approach to the respondents' self- and world-related conceptual categories, without enormous rational processing. The results provide us, first, with associative ranges for constructs of the world and the self, where some associative dimensions are defined by semantic polarities in the meanings of peripheral categories (e.g., Nature vs. Culture). Second, our analysis showed that some groups of verbal categories that were associated with the words world and self are central, while others are peripheral with respect to the central position. Third, the analysis of category networks revealed that some categories play the role of a transmitter, mediating the pathway between other categories in the network.

Keywords: free association; personal construct theory; philosophical psychology; psycholinguistics; self; world.

Figures

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 1
Overall association distribution in categories.
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 2
Overall association distribution in categories.
FIGURE 3
FIGURE 3
Component plot in rotated space chart for world.
FIGURE 4
FIGURE 4
Component plot in rotated space chart for self.
FIGURE 5
FIGURE 5
Category network for world.
FIGURE 6
FIGURE 6
Category network for self.

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