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Review
, 9 (3)

TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity

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Review

TRP Channels as Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes and Obesity

Andrea Zsombok et al. Pharmaceuticals (Basel).

Abstract

During the last three to four decades the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus has greatly increased worldwide, including in the United States. Both the short- and long-term forecasts predict serious consequences for the near future, and encourage the development of solutions for the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were identified in tissues and organs important for the control of whole body metabolism. A variety of TRP channels has been shown to play a role in the regulation of hormone release, energy expenditure, pancreatic function, and neurotransmitter release in control, obese and/or diabetic conditions. Moreover, dietary supplementation of natural ligands of TRP channels has been shown to have potential beneficial effects in obese and diabetic conditions. These findings raised the interest and likelihood for potential drug development. In this mini-review, we discuss possibilities for better management of obesity and diabetes mellitus based on TRP-dependent mechanisms.

Keywords: TRPA1; TRPM; TRPV1; diabetes mellitus; glucose homeostasis; metabolism; obesity.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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