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. 2016 Jun 26;6(15):5129-43.
doi: 10.1002/ece3.2275. eCollection 2016 Aug.

Variation of Life-History Traits of the Asian Corn Borer, Ostrinia Furnacalis in Relation to Temperature and Geographical Latitude

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Free PMC article

Variation of Life-History Traits of the Asian Corn Borer, Ostrinia Furnacalis in Relation to Temperature and Geographical Latitude

Liang Xiao et al. Ecol Evol. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Life-history traits from four geographical populations (tropical Ledong population [LD], subtropical Guangzhou [GZ] and Yongxiu populations, and temperate Langfang population [LF]) of the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis were investigated at a wide range of temperatures (20-32°C). The larval and pupal times were significantly decreased with increasing rearing temperature, and growth rate was positively correlated with temperature. The relationship between body weight and rearing temperature in O. furnacalis did not follow the temperature-size rule (TSR); all populations exhibited the highest pupal and adult weights at high temperatures or intermediate temperatures. However, development time, growth rate, and body weight did not show a constant latitudinal gradient. Across all populations at each temperature, female were significantly bigger than males, showing a female-biased sexual size dimorphism (SSD). Contrary to Rensch's rule, the SSD tended to increase with rising temperature. The subtropical GZ population exhibited the largest degree of dimorphism while the temperate LF exhibited the smallest. Male pupae lose significantly more weight at metamorphosis compared to females. The proportionate weight losses of different populations were significantly different. Adult longevity was significantly decreased with increasing temperature. Between sexes, all populations exhibit a rather female-biased adult longevity. Finally, we discuss the adaptive significance of higher temperature-inducing high body weight in the moth's life history and why the moth exhibits the reverse TSR.

Keywords: Body weight; Ostrinia furnacalis; development time; geographical populations; growth rate; sexual size dimorphism; temperature.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
The location of collection sites of samples of Ostrinia furnacalis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Larval development time, pupal time, and total development time (larval + pupal time) in Ostrinia furnacalis females and males in relation to temperatures and populations (LD: tropical Ledong population; GZ: subtropical Guangzhou population; YX: subtropical Yongxiu population; LF: temperate Langfang population). Error bars indicated SE.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Pupal weight and larval growth rate in Ostrinia furnacalis females and males in relation to temperatures and populations (LD: tropical Ledong population; GZ: subtropical Guangzhou population; YX: subtropical Yongxiu population; LF: temperate Langfang population). Error bars indicated SE.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Sexual size dimorphism of populations of Ostrinia furnacalis reared at seven different temperatures (20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, and 32°C). Sexual dimorphism was estimated for each population at each temperature as (mean size of the larger sex [mg]/mean size of the smaller sex [mg]) − 1, made positive when females were the larger sex and negative when males were the larger sex. Error bars indicated SE.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Adult weight and proportionate weight loss of Ostrinia furnacalis females and males in relation to temperatures and populations (LD: tropical Ledong population, GZ: subtropical Guangzhou population, YX: subtropical Yongxiu population, LF: temperate Langfang population). Error bars indicated SE.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Survival curves of Ostrinia furnacalis females from four populations at each experimental temperature.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Survival curves of Ostrinia furnacalis males from four populations at each experimental temperature.

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