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Clinical Trial
. 2016 Aug 26;14(1):246.
doi: 10.1186/s12967-016-0998-2.

Intra-articular Injection of Two Different Doses of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Multicenter Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial (Phase I/II)

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Free PMC article
Clinical Trial

Intra-articular Injection of Two Different Doses of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Versus Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Multicenter Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial (Phase I/II)

José M Lamo-Espinosa et al. J Transl Med. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising option to treat knee osteoarthritis. Their safety and usefulness must be confirmed and the optimal dose established. We tested increasing doses of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in combination with hyaluronic acid in a randomized clinical trial.

Materials: A phase I/II multicenter randomized clinical trial with active control was conducted. Thirty patients diagnosed with knee OA were randomly assigned to intraarticularly administered hyaluronic acid alone (control), or together with 10 × 10(6) or 100 × 10(6) cultured autologous BM-MSCs, and followed up for 12 months. Pain and function were assessed using VAS and WOMAC and by measuring the knee motion range. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging analyses were performed to analyze joint damage.

Results: No adverse effects were reported after BM-MSC administration or during follow-up. BM-MSC-administered patients improved according to VAS during all follow-up evaluations and median value (IQR) for control, low-dose and high-dose groups change from 5 (3, 7), 7 (5, 8) and 6 (4, 8) to 4 (3, 5), 2 (1, 3) and 2 (0,4) respectively at 12 months (low-dose vs control group p = 0.005 and high-dose vs control group p < 0.009). BM-MSC-administered patients were also superior according to WOMAC, although improvement in control and low-dose patients could not be significantly sustained beyond 6 months. On the other hand, the BM-MSC high-dose group exhibited an improvement of 16.5 (12, 19) points at 12 months (p < 0.01). Consistent with WOMAC and VAS values, motion ranges remained unaltered in the control group but improved at 12 months with BM-MSCs. X-ray revealed a reduction of the knee joint space width in the control group that was not seen in BM-MSCs high-dose group. MRI (WORMS protocol) showed that joint damage decreased only in the BM-MSC high-dose group, albeit slightly.

Conclusions: The single intraarticular injection of in vitro expanded autologous BM-MSCs together with HA is a safe and feasible procedure that results in a clinical and functional improvement of knee OA, especially when 100 × 10(6) cells are administered. These results pave the way for a future phase III clinical trial.

Clinical trials: gov identifier NCT02123368. Nº EudraCT: 2009-017624-72.

Keywords: Bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells; Knee osteoarthritis; Non-surgical management; Stem cell therapy.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Study flow diagram. Patients were screened in the two participating centers by using the inclusion and exclusion criteria
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
VAS scores along the study. The median values of VAS in the three groups before administration of treatments and 3, 6 and 12 months afterwards are presented. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 with respect to the baseline value of the same group
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Knee range of motion along the study. The median values expressed in degrees of the goniometric measurements of the knee flexion (top) and extension (bottom) ranges of motion before administration of treatments and 3, 6 and 12 months afterwards are presented. *p < 0.05; **p < 0.01 with respect to the baseline value of the high-dose group. #p < 0.05 with respect to the baseline valued of the low-dose group

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