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Case Reports
, 7 (4), 268-71

Lipoma in the Subscapularis Muscle Causing Scapular Malposition

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Case Reports

Lipoma in the Subscapularis Muscle Causing Scapular Malposition

Yusuke Kawano et al. Shoulder Elbow.

Abstract

A 70-year-old woman had pain and fatigability of her left shoulder with asymmetric scapular position. The medial border of the scapula was more prominent in the left side compared to the right scapula, and scapular motion was different between sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass on the ventral surface of the scapula. Tumour resection was performed through the medial approach, and the tissue samples were found to be a lipoma with a pathological examination. Post-operatively, her pain immediately disappeared. Two years after surgery, no recurrence of the tumour had been found. Soft tissue tumours have never been reported as a cause of scapular malposition or winging. We reported a case with scapular malposition and dyskinesis caused by lipoma in the subscapularis muscle. Surgical resection successfully relieved her symptoms and improved the scapular motion. Soft tissue tumour occurring in the subscapularis muscle could possibly cause abnormal scapular position and motion.

Keywords: Rotator cuff lipoma; scapular dyskinesis; scapular malposition; scapular winging; subscapularis lipoma.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
The medial border of the scapula is more prominent on the left side than on the right side.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Magnetic resonnace imaging shows a 70 mm × 50 mm × 30 mm homogeneous tumour in the subscapularis muscle (white arrows). (A) Axial section, T1-weighted image. *Tumour; HH, humeral head; S, scapula; ISP, infraspinatus muscle. (B) Oblique sagittal section, T2-weighted image. *Tumour; SSP, supraspinatus muscle, ISP, infraspinatus muscle.
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
A 70 mm × 58 mm × 29 mm tumour is resected from the subscapularis muscle through the medial approach. White arrow, tumour; black arrow, medial border of the scapula.
Figure 4.
Figure 4.
Two years after surgery, the prominence of the scapula is unclear.

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