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, 15 (1), 293-300

Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe Vera L. Aqueous Extract Through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats

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Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe Vera L. Aqueous Extract Through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats

Fatemeh Abdollahnejad et al. Iran J Pharm Res.

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extract of Aloe vera on rats. In order to evaluate the overall hypnotic effects of the Aloe vera extract, open field and loss of righting reflex tests were primarily used. The sedative and hypnotic effects of the extract were then confirmed by detection of remarkable raise in the total sleeping time through analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of animals. Analysis of the EEG recordings showed that there is concomitant change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and None Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in parallel with the prolonged total sleeping time. Results of the current research show that the extract has sedative-hypnotic effects on both functional and electrical activities of the brain.

Keywords: Aloe vera; Electroencephalography; Electromyography; Insomnia; Sedative-Hypnotic effects.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Aloe vera (A. vera) aqueous extract prolonged pentobarbital induced loss of righting reflex. Rats received pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min following Aloe vera extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) or diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.). A. vera hypnotic effects were evaluated based on increasing the sleeping time in test animals. Data are represented as mean ± SD (n=6). *** p < 0.001, ** p < 0.01 compared to control group
Figure 2
Figure 2
Aloe vera (A. vera) aqueous extract repressed animals' locomotor activity. 30 min after Aloe vera extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) or diazepam (2 mg/kg, i.p.), animals were subjected to open field test and animals’ total distance moved were compared as an indicative for locomotor activity. Data are represented as mean ± SD (n=6). *** p < 0.001, ** p < 0.01 compared to control group
Figure 3
Figure 3
Impact of Aloe vera (A. vera) extract administration on electroencephalographic architecture of sleep. Day-time EEG and EMG recordings were conducted in freely moving rats following 30 min post Aloe vera or diazepam administration for 4 hours. Accordingly, Aloe vera aqueous extract (200 mg/kg, i.p.) prolonged total sleeping time (A) as well as NREM sleep (B) while reduced sleeping time spent in REM (C). Data are represented as mean ± SD (n=6). * p < 0.05, ***p < 0.001 compared to control group

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