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Review
, 138 (39), 12692-12714

Radicals: Reactive Intermediates With Translational Potential

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Review

Radicals: Reactive Intermediates With Translational Potential

Ming Yan et al. J Am Chem Soc.

Abstract

This Perspective illustrates the defining characteristics of free radical chemistry, beginning with its rich and storied history. Studies from our laboratory are discussed along with recent developments emanating from others in this burgeoning area. The practicality and chemoselectivity of radical reactions enable rapid access to molecules of relevance to drug discovery, agrochemistry, material science, and other disciplines. Thus, these reactive intermediates possess inherent translational potential, as they can be widely used to expedite scientific endeavors for the betterment of humankind.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Selected milestones in radical chemistry.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Evolution of enolate oxidative coupling in our laboratory and its synthetic applications.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Development and applications of the borono-Minisci reaction.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Development and applications of sulfinate reagents as enabling radical precursors in biomedical research.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Olefins as latent radicals: applications to C–C and C–N bond construction.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Development of redox-active esters (RAEs) as radical precursors in cross-coupling reactions.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Radical chemistry: selected highlights from the past 5 years that capitalize on the unique power of these reactive intermediates.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Revisiting the persistent radical effect (PRE).

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