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. 2016;2016:2483263.
doi: 10.1155/2016/2483263. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People With Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

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Free PMC article

Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People With Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

Dianne Goeman et al. J Diabetes Res. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS). Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Program logic model for intervention.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Intervention selection and development (Phase two).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Flow diagram of Phase 3 of the Ophelia health literacy intervention showing client selection, intervention, and evaluation tasks.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Changes in three HLQ scores before and after intervention (n = 15).

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