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. 2016 Oct 18;50(20):10923-10932.
doi: 10.1021/acs.est.6b01980. Epub 2016 Sep 27.

Identification, Tissue Distribution, and Bioaccumulation Potential of Cyclic Perfluorinated Sulfonic Acids Isomers in an Airport Impacted Ecosystem

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Identification, Tissue Distribution, and Bioaccumulation Potential of Cyclic Perfluorinated Sulfonic Acids Isomers in an Airport Impacted Ecosystem

Yuan Wang et al. Environ Sci Technol. .

Abstract

The use of cyclic perfluoroalkyl acids as anticorrosive agents in hydraulic fluids remains a poorly characterized source of organofluorine compounds to the environment. Here, we investigated the presence of perfluoroethylenecyclohexanesulfonate (PFECHS) isomers in environmental samples for the first time using a combination of high resolution and tandem mass spectrometry. Five distinct peaks attributed to different isomers of PFECHS and perfluoropropylcyclopentanesulfonate (PFPCPeS) were identified in environmental samples. The sum of PFECHS and PFPCPeS isomers displayed logarithmically decreasing spatial trends in water (1.04-324 ng/L) and sediment samples (<MLQ - 2.23 ng/g dw) with increasing distance from Beijing international airport. PFECHS and PFPCPeS displayed the highest accumulation in liver, kidney, blood and bladder and average whole body bioaccumulation factors (log BAFwhole-body) were estimated to be 2.7 and 1.9 respectively. Isomer-specific differences in the tissue/blood distribution ratios and BAFwhole-body indicate that ring structure and position of the sulfonic acid group affect the bioaccumulation potential of cyclic perfluoroalkyl acids. Based on the high mobility and moderate bioaccumulation potential of cyclic perfluorinated acids it is suggested that contamination of aquifers used for drinking water around airports may be a hitherto overlooked problem for this novel class of contaminants.

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