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, 2016, 5607507

Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

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Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

Katarzyna Wielemborek-Musial et al. Biomed Res Int.

Abstract

Background. The assessment of blood pressure (BP) response during exercise test is an important diagnostic instrument in cardiovascular system evaluation. The study aim was to determine normal values of BP response to submaximal, multistage exercise test in healthy adults with regard to their age, gender, and workload. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in randomly selected normotensive subjects (n = 1015), 512 females and 498 males, aged 18-64 years (mean age 42.1 ± 12.7 years) divided into five age groups. All subjects were clinically healthy with no chronic diseases diagnosed. Exercise stress tests were performed using Monark bicycle ergometer until a minimum of 85% of physical capacity was reached. BP was measured at rest and at peak of each exercise test stage. Results. The relations between BP, age, and workload during exercise test were determined by linear regression analysis and can be illustrated by the equations: systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.346 × load (W) + 135.76 for males and systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.103 × load (W) + 155.72 for females. Conclusions. Systolic BP increases significantly and proportionally to workload increase during exercise test in healthy adults. The relation can be described by linear equation which can be useful in diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Regression line and two standards of deviation for linear relationship between exercise systolic blood pressure and exercise workload in all the males irrespective of age. Linear relationship between exercise systolic blood pressure and exercise workload in all the males irrespective of age and in particular age groups: (a) age group 18–24, (b) age group 25–34, (c) age group 35–44, (d) age group 45–54, (e) age group 55–64, and (f) all the study men.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Regression line and two standards of deviation for linear relationship between exercise systolic blood pressure and exercise workload in all the females irrespective of age and in particular age groups: (a) age group 18–24, (b) age group 25–34, (c) age group 35–44, (d) age group 45–54, (e) age group 55–64, and (f) all the study women.

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