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Review
. 2010 May 26;3(6):1711-1728.
doi: 10.3390/ph3061711.

Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

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Free PMC article
Review

Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

Eddie L Chang et al. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH₃)₆]3+ ion.

Keywords: antibacterial; antiviral; cobalt.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Structure of CTC-type cobalt(III) complexes (imd = imidazole, 2-mimd = 2-methylimidazole).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Proposed interaction of histidine containing protein with CTC-complexes.
Figure 3
Figure 3
(a) Degree of inhibition of Sindbis virus plaque formation plotted as a function of Cohex concentration for the 48 h data set. The IC50 for inhibition was determined to be 0.10 ± 0.04 mM Cohex using a one-site dose response logistic curve fit function. (b) Structure of Cohex cation 2 (chloride counterions omitted for clarity).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Structures of cobalt(III) carboranes used as HIV-1 inhibitors.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Interaction of compound 3 with hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV protease.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Oxime cobalt(III) complexes 9 and 10.
Figure 7
Figure 7
ORTEP representation of Pr-BIAN ligand (adapted from Ref. [25]).
Figure 8
Figure 8
Cobalt(III) containing metallosurfactants.
Figure 9
Figure 9
Ethylenediamine cobalt(III) cations 15 (bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands are coordinated in bidentate chelating mode to the metal ion).
Figure 10
Figure 10
Neutral and anionic pyridine-amide cobalt(III) complexes.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Tetragonal and octahedral cobalt (III) complexes containing N, O chelating Schiff base ligands.
Figure 12
Figure 12
Dinitrosoresorcinol and violuric acid ligands.
Figure 13
Figure 13
Cobalt(III) complexes containing bidentate and tridentate nitrogen/sulfur donor ligands.
Figure 14
Figure 14
Cobalt(III) complexes containing bidentate and tetradentate nitrogen/sulfur donor ligands.
Figure 15
Figure 15
Selenium containing and organometallic cobalt(III) complexes.
Figure 16
Figure 16
Comparison of cytotoxicity of Cohex against BHK cells with commercial drug cisplatin using CellTiter96.
Figure 17
Figure 17
Weight loss of C57BL/6J mice exposed to platinum(II) and cobalt(III) complexes. 1X is equivalent to approx. 1 mM [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 in blood volume of the mice. Cycmmb = methyl 4-[(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl)methylbenzoate.

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