Education, Employment, Income, and Marital Status Among Adults Diagnosed With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases During Childhood or Adolescence

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017 Apr;15(4):518-524. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2016.09.146. Epub 2016 Oct 4.

Abstract

Background & aims: We aimed to assess levels of education attained, employment, and marital status of adults diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) during childhood or adolescence, compared with healthy individuals in Canada.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of adults diagnosed with IBD in childhood or adolescence at Children's Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba from January 1978 through December 2007. Participants (n = 112) answered a semi-structured questionnaire on educational achievements, employment, and marital status. Patients were matched for age and sex with random healthy individuals from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey (controls, 5 per patient). Conditional binary logistic regression and random-effects ordinal logistic regression models were used for analysis.

Results: Patients were followed for a mean duration of 14.3 years (range, 3.1-34.5 years). Persons with IBD were more likely to earn more money per annum and attain a post-secondary school degree or receive a diploma than controls (odds ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.60; P < .01 and odds ratio, 2.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-5.04; P < .01, respectively). There was no significant difference between patients and controls in employment or marital status.

Conclusions: Adults diagnosed with IBD during childhood seem to achieve higher education levels than individuals without IBD. This observation should provide reassurance to children with IBD and their parents. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02152241.

Keywords: CCHS; Crohn’s Disease; Long-term Effect; Marriage; Occupation; Ulcerative Colitis.

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Education*
  • Employment*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Income*
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases / epidemiology*
  • Male
  • Manitoba / epidemiology
  • Marital Status*
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Young Adult

Associated data

  • ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT02152241