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Review
, 2 (3), 167-180

Multimodal Neuroimaging Computing: A Review of the Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

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Review

Multimodal Neuroimaging Computing: A Review of the Applications in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Sidong Liu et al. Brain Inform.

Abstract

Multimodal neuroimaging is increasingly used in neuroscience research, as it overcomes the limitations of individual modalities. One of the most important applications of multimodal neuroimaging is the provision of vital diagnostic data for neuropsychiatric disorders. Multimodal neuroimaging computing enables the visualization and quantitative analysis of the alterations in brain structure and function, and has reshaped how neuroscience research is carried out. Research in this area is growing exponentially, and so it is an appropriate time to review the current and future development of this emerging area. Hence, in this paper, we review the recent advances in multimodal neuroimaging (MRI, PET) and electrophysiological (EEG, MEG) technologies, and their applications to the neuropsychiatric disorders. We also outline some future directions for multimodal neuroimaging where researchers will design more advanced methods and models for neuropsychiatric research.

Keywords: Multimodal; Neuroimaging; Neuropsychiatric.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
The explosive growth of multimodal neuroimaging studies over the past two decades. (Color figure online)
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
The overview of the properties of sMRI (blue), dMRI (green), fMRI (orange), PET (red), EEG (violet), and multimodal neuroimaging (gray), as indicated by the polar diagrams. Each axis in the diagram represents an attribute, and greater distance from the origin means better performance. Note the indexes in the diagrams are merely indicative and should not be interpreted in a quantitative way. (Color figure online)
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
The disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of 291 diseases and injuries based on the systematic analysis of descriptive epidemiology from 1990 to 2010 in US [58]. (Color figure online)
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
The applications of the multimodal neuroimaging approaches in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as in stroke, brain injury, brain tumor, and connectome. The color of circle indicates various neuroimaging techniques, same as in Fig. 2. The size of the circle indicates the prevalence of use the technique in specific applications. Note the sizes are only indicative and should not be interpreted in a quantitative way. (Color figure online)

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