Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 9, 753-757
eCollection

Data From Three Prospective Longitudinal Human Cohorts of Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Offspring Outcomes From the Fetal Period Through Young Adulthood

Affiliations

Data From Three Prospective Longitudinal Human Cohorts of Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Offspring Outcomes From the Fetal Period Through Young Adulthood

Gabrielle L McLemore et al. Data Brief.

Abstract

This article includes data from three prospective longitudinal human cohorts of prenatal marijuana exposure (PME) and offspring outcomes from the fetal period through young adulthood. The table herein contains an overview of the major adverse effects associated with PME from the following human cohorts: (1) The Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study (OPPS); (2) The Maternal Health Practices and Child Development Study (MHPCD); and (3) The Generation R Study (Gen R). In the OPPS, fetal gestational age was measured and age-appropriate standardized neuropsychological instruments were used to assess neonatal responses, and infant-child and adolescent-young adult cognitive and behavioral skills. In the MHPCD, birth length and weight, neonatal body length, and infant-child sleep, cognition, and behavioral parameters were measured. In the Gen R, birth weight and growth were measured, as were infant-child attention and aggression. The data in this article are in support of our report entitled "Prenatal Cannabis Exposure - The "First Hit" to the Endocannabinoid System" (K.A. Richardson, A.K. Hester, G.L. McLemore, 2016) [13].

Keywords: Behavioral skills; Cognitive skills; Fetal period; Maternal Health Practices and Child Development Study (MHPCD); Offspring outcomes; Ottawa Prenatal Prospective Study (OPPS); Prenatal marijuana exposure (PME); Prospective longitudinal human cohorts; Psychological skills; The Generation R Study (Gen R); Young adulthood.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 2 PubMed Central articles

References

    1. Calvigioni D., Hurd Y.L., Harkany T., Keimpema E. Neuronal substrates and functional consequences of prenatal cannabis exposure. Eur. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry. 2014;23(10):931–941. [Epub 2014 May 3. Review. PubMed PMID: 24793873; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4459494] - PMC - PubMed
    1. Day N.L., Richardson G.A. Prenatal marijuana use: epidemiology, methodologic issues, and infant outcome. Clin. Perinatol. 1991;18(1):77–91. [Review. PubMed PMID: 2040119] - PubMed
    1. Day N., Sambamoorthi U., Taylor P., Richardson G., Robles N., Jhon Y., Scher M., Stoffer D., Cornelius M., Jasperse D. Prenatal marijuana use and neonatal outcome. Neurotoxicol. Teratol. 1991;13(3):329–334. [PubMed PMID: 1886543] - PubMed
    1. El Marroun H., Hudziak J.J., Tiemeier H., Creemers H., Steegers E.A., Jaddoe V.W., Hofman A., Verhulst F.C., van den Brink W., Huizink A.C. Intrauterine cannabis exposure leads to more aggressive behavior and attention problems in 18-month-old girls. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011;118(2-3):470–474. [Epub 2011 Apr 5. PubMed PMID: 21470799] - PubMed
    1. El Marroun H., Tiemeier H., Steegers E.A., Jaddoe V.W., Hofman A., Verhulst F.C., vanden Brink W., Huizink A.C. Intrauterine cannabis exposure affects fetal growth trajectories: the generation R study. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry. 2009;48(12):1173–1181. [PubMed PMID: 19858757] - PubMed
Feedback