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, 25 (6), 328-332

Neonatal Administration of Memantine Enhances Social Cognition in Adult Rats Subjected to Early Maternal Deprivation

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Neonatal Administration of Memantine Enhances Social Cognition in Adult Rats Subjected to Early Maternal Deprivation

Ezequiel Uribe et al. Exp Neurobiol.

Abstract

Schizophrenia is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder; however, all the available treatment options are used when the disease becomes clinically significant in adolescence or early adulthood. Using a developmental rat model of schizophrenia, we examined whether neonatal treatment with memantine, an NMDA receptor modulator, can improve schizophrenic-like symptoms in adulthood. Early maternal deprivation in rats produces deficits in social interaction behaviors in adulthood. In contrast, memantine administrated in neonatal rats subjected to early maternal deprivation significantly reduces deficits in social interaction behaviors in adulthood. These results raise the possibility that pharmacological treatment with memantine at the early developmental stage helps people with a risk to develop schizophrenic-like symptoms.

Keywords: Schizophrenia; developing brain; glutamate; neonatal; neuropharmacology; social cognition.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1. Active linking values (AL), recognition pattern (RP) and total traveled distance (TTD) of deprived and non-deprived rats after treatment with saline, MEM at 10 mg·Kg-1, saline (black bars) or HAL at 0.25 mg·Kg-1, s.c. (grey bars). Behaviors were evaluated at the 5th and 8th postnatal weeks. Data points are means +/- SD (n=5, each). *p<0.05, **p<0.01 for different between groups; one black square p<0.05; two black squares p<0.01; three black squares p<0.005 for differences with saline non-deprived group (non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn post-hoc test).
Fig. 2
Fig. 2. Distribution pattern (DP) in the open field of deprived and non-deprived rats after treatment with SAL, MEM at 10 mg·Kg-1, s.c. or HAL at 0.25 mg·Kg-1, s.c. Behaviors were evaluated at the 5th and 8th postnatal weeks. Data points are means +/- SD (n=5, each). **p<0.01, ***p<0.005 (non-parametric multivariable PERMANOVA test).

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