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, 62 (4), 994-1001

Overlap of Dyspepsia in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Impact of Clinical, Metabolic, and Psychosocial Characteristics

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Overlap of Dyspepsia in Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Impact of Clinical, Metabolic, and Psychosocial Characteristics

Ching-Sheng Hsu et al. Dig Dis Sci.

Abstract

Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and dyspepsia are highly prevalent in the general population with significant symptom overlap, while the interaction between both remains poorly understood.

Aim: To examine whether GERD overlapping dyspepsia would have an impact on clinical and psychological features as compared with GERD alone.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study in a GERD cohort (n = 868) that was previously recruited from a population-based GERD survey (n = 2752). We compared the clinical and psychological factors between patients with and without dyspeptic symptoms "epigastric pain or burning." All participants were evaluated with Reflux Disease Questionnaire score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire score, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score. Endoscopic findings were classified according to the Los Angeles classification.

Results: Among the GERD population, 107 subjects had overlapping "epigastric pain or burning" (GERD-D), and 761 did not have these symptoms (GERD alone). GERD-D subjects had more severe GERD symptoms and were more often associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) (OR 3.54, 95% CI 1.92-6.52) as compared subjects with GERD alone. In addition, GERD-D subjects had lower quality of sleep (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.01-1.21), higher depression (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10), lower blood pressure (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.22-0.95), and higher serum total cholesterol levels (OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.36-5.67) than GERD alone.

Conclusions: GERD-D subjects are characterized with worsening clinical symptoms as well as higher psychosocial, IBS, and metabolic comorbidities, but less erosive esophagitis. Our results indicate that clinical awareness of such overlapping condition would help optimize the management of GERD in clinical practice.

Keywords: Cross-sectional study; Dyspepsia; Humans; Questionnaires.

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