Primary Intraprostatic Synovial Sarcoma

Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2017 Feb;141(2):301-304. doi: 10.5858/arpa.2016-0101-RS.

Abstract

Primary intraprostatic synovial sarcoma is a rare presentation of an otherwise well-studied disease, and it is one of the few primary sarcomas to occur in the prostate. Ancillary diagnostic techniques including immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics are useful to establish a definitive diagnosis. Despite its unorthodox location, it shares histologic and molecular genetic characteristics with tumors found elsewhere in the body. Most notably, the chromosomal translocation t(X;18)(p11;q11) encodes a chimeric transcription-activating protein, SS18-SSX, which has been identified as the primary driver mutation. The SS18-SSX fusion gene provides a consistent and dependable means of establishing a definitive diagnosis via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Recent studies have continued to provide insight into the oncogenesis of this disease. The goal of this review is to elaborate on the clinicopathologic characteristics and underline those techniques that best facilitate the diagnosis of primary intraprostatic synovial sarcoma.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Male
  • Oncogene Proteins, Fusion / genetics
  • Prostatic Neoplasms / diagnosis*
  • Prostatic Neoplasms / genetics
  • Prostatic Neoplasms / pathology
  • Sarcoma, Synovial / diagnosis*
  • Sarcoma, Synovial / genetics
  • Sarcoma, Synovial / pathology

Substances

  • Oncogene Proteins, Fusion
  • SS18-SSX1 fusion protein
  • SYT-SSX fusion protein