Dynamics of cancerous tissue correlates with invasiveness

Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 6;7:43800. doi: 10.1038/srep43800.

Abstract

Two of the classical hallmarks of cancer are uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasion, which turn the disease into a systemic, life-threatening condition. Although both processes are studied, a clear correlation between cell division and motility of cancer cells has not been described previously. Here, we experimentally characterize the dynamics of invasive and non-invasive breast cancer tissues using human and murine model systems. The intrinsic tissue velocities, as well as the divergence and vorticity around a dividing cell correlate strongly with the invasive potential of the tissue, thus showing a distinct correlation between tissue dynamics and aggressiveness. We formulate a model which treats the tissue as a visco-elastic continuum. This model provides a valid reproduction of the cancerous tissue dynamics, thus, biological signaling is not needed to explain the observed tissue dynamics. The model returns the characteristic force exerted by an invading cell and reveals a strong correlation between force and invasiveness of breast cancer cells, thus pinpointing the importance of mechanics for cancer invasion.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Algorithms*
  • Animals
  • Breast Neoplasms / pathology
  • Cell Line, Tumor
  • Cell Movement*
  • Humans
  • Kinetics
  • MCF-7 Cells
  • Mammary Neoplasms, Animal / pathology
  • Mice
  • Microscopy, Phase-Contrast
  • Models, Biological*
  • Neoplasm Invasiveness
  • Time-Lapse Imaging / methods*